Episodes

263: Thomas Wirthlin McConkie – Diplomat to Magician

We sit down again with my good friend Thomas Wirthlin McConkie and take a deeper dive into his integral development map.  We start with the Diplomat and work our way to the Magician working to break these stages down in terms of their gifts and the fallbacks while also speaking to the tension that exists in each stage as it rubs against stages on either side.

Resources:

Thomas McConkie’s Mindfulness + podcast

Navigating Mormon Faith Crisis

 

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5 thoughts on “263: Thomas Wirthlin McConkie – Diplomat to Magician

  1. Bill, I was about to cancel my premium membership because I felt that your podcast wasn’t providing me with tools to expand my faith and only causing me to continually doubt. This was something good and worth while, hopefully the things of God can always amaze us.

  2. This podcast gave me hope that I can stay in the church and be authentic. Hiding in the shadows is not a place I want to remain. Thank you so much for helping me see ways to work my way through this very messy and painful place. I admire the work of Thomas McConkie, and have found his book a useful tool.

  3. I really enjoyed Thomas’s insight and explanation on his developmental map. Early on in the podcast I was expecting this to be jush a rehash (with different labels) of Fowlers model but I hung in there and was quite delighted to the contrary. Thomas’s map resonated much deeper on a personal level and its relation to Mormonism. I enjoyed the tone of the message and the hope it provides for anyone going through faith struggles. Especially the idea that to experience growth, the necessity of opposition as that medium to finding real joy and eventual belief, was possible if we just endure.

    I’m hopeful that these kind of podcasts that emphasis the need to understanding and tolerance on both ends of the spectrum are more plentiful vs. the other progressive sites that seem to be going more negative. Bravo on this one Bill !!!!

  4. Just another obvious cashing in on a famous mormon name. Think I am cynical? Nothing like the cynicism of rejoining the church to write a book.

    • You speak out out of defensiveness and ignorance. You shown your cards and don’t even know the game your playing. Thomas has stayed in my home and we have broke bread together and your perspective is the very definition of biblical pharisaical attitude. It is easy to dismiss someone. Instead I would suggest you let go of your own perspective if possible and try to see the world from the view of another. Thomas is my friend and I know him well. He is as genuine and real and wise as any person I have ever met.

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